Falcon Heavy Launch Lamp

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  • Regular price $49.00 + Free shipping


  • 12" tall
  • LED light is USB powered with a wall outlet adapter included
  • 3D printed with PLA plastic

This lamp is a detailed model of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. It's designed so that the exhaust plume glows, making it look as though the rocket is lifting off. It's a great eye-catching decor piece for a space enthusiast's desk or bookshelf.

The Falcon Heavy lamp is 12" tall and is powered by USB. We include a USB wall adapter in the box. The cord has a convenient switch for turning the lamp off and on. Although the lamp glows brightly, it's not intended to light up a room on its own--think of it as more of an accent piece.

About the Falcon Heavy: 

The Falcon Heavy is a heavy-lift partially reusable rocket that is currently SpaceX's most powerful launch vehicle. Although not as commonly used as the Falcon 9 (which is used for resupplying the International Space Station, transporting astronauts in the Dragon spacecraft, and more), the Falcon Heavy provides significantly more lift capability which is needed for putting satellites into certain orbits. 

It first flew in February 2018 in a launch that famously included Elon Musk's personal Tesla Roadster as the payload. Since then, the Falcon Heavy has flown two more times with operational payloads. Several more flights are currently planned.

The Falcon Heavy is based on the more common Falcon 9, and the first stage is essentially three Falcon 9 boosters attached together. All three boosters are intended to land and be reused. So far, SpaceX has successfully recovered the two side boosters in each of the Falcon Heavy's three flights, but has only recovered the center booster once. 

Although the Falcon Heavy was originally designed to transport astronauts beyond Earth's orbit, SpaceX has since decided to not pursue human flight certification for the rocket and instead use the Starship system for that purpose. However, the Falcon Heavy still has a full schedule of launches ahead, and is still the only rocket that has achieved in a simultaneous landing of multiple boosters.